Netherlands in TIME magazine

Articles on Holland (Nederland) in 85 years of TIME (1923 – 2008)

Archive for 1947


Over the Tulips

355

Two of The Netherlands’ top plant pathologists arrived in Washington, D.C. last week on an important commercial mission, because U.S. wanted to cut tulip bulb shipments.

Two of The Netherlands’ top plant pathologists arrived in Washington, D.C. last week on an important commercial mission. They were there to talk the Department of Agriculture out of limiting imports of Netherlands bulbs (1946 imports: $8,000,000). The department wanted to cut bulb shipments to “amounts needed for propagation…

Sentimental Journey

569

Prime-Minister of Canada Mackenzie King visited the Netherlands, where he visited a Canadian military cemetery.

It was the kind of trip the Prime Minister likes best—sights to see, a respectable minimum of speeches and official duties, a sentimental mission or two.

Paris was a one-day stop. There Mackenzie King paid homage to the man who he believes is one of history’s greatest. At the…

No. 30

149

Into New York harbor last week steamed the refurbished 36,667-ton Nieuw Amsterdam, flagship of the Holland-America Line and faithful troopship through World War II.

Into New York harbor last week steamed the refurbished 36,667-ton Nieuw Amsterdam, flagship of the Holland-America Line and faithful troopship through World War II. The Nieuw Amsterdam was the 30th big liner to go into transatlantic passenger service since the war. The liners include eight U.S. Maritime Commission ships…

Long Live the Queen!

173

Tired Queen Wilhelmina announced that, “for reasons of health,” she would “temporarily” transfer the business of ruling to her strapping daughter, Princess Juliana.

Queen Wilhelmina was tired. For 49 years, ever since she was a girl of 18 (whom Playwright Edmond Rostand once described as “the little lily queen who rules over the kingdom of tulips”), she had worn the crown—or the somewhat knockabout hats which she preferred.

Like a competent…

Svengali in Scheveningen?

354

At a symphony concert in the Dutch city of Scheveningen two solists were suddenly struck with amnesia. It was said to be a bet: succesfully disturbing the performance by tele-hypnosis.

It was the last symphony concert of the season in the Dutch resort city of Scheveningen. Suddenly, during a Bach violin concerto, Soloist Sam Swaap started scrubbing his fiddle discordantly. Then he stopped cold for a dozen bars, holding his fiddle like a broken toy. After embarrassing moments, Swaap got…

Spreading Wings

869

Holland’s K.L.M. Lines, restored to prewar strength, is already giving U.S. lines plenty of competition.

On the world’s airways, one fact was plain: the Air Age needed a lot of supercharging from state subsidies to maintain flying speed. Because of subsidies, free-enterprising American-flag lines, once way ahead, could now see a handful of foreign lines, state-supported in varying degrees, creeping up on their tails. On…

“Cease Forthwith”

370

The UN Secrutity Council voted (8-0) a stern resolution: the Council “calls upon” The Netherlands and the Indonesian Republic “to cease hostilities forthwith.”

The Indonesian mess was almost providential in its timing. Joyfully, the Security Council dropped the Greek situation to cope with a situation cut more to the U.N. size. With unprecedented speed the Council voted (8-0) a stern resolution: the Council “calls upon” The Netherlands and the Indonesian Republic “to cease…

A Letter From The Publisher

685

Hans Bronkhorst, a Dutch journalist, sets down his view of TIME Magazine for readers of The Netherlands in his weekly, De Linie.

TIME, whose four international editions are now available almost anywhere in the world (except Soviet Russia, her satellites, and some other inaccessible places) on or before issue date, is, as you know, a journal of U.S. and world affairs written from the American viewpoint. Recently, Hans Bronkhorst, a Dutch journalist,…

Recolonialization?

278

Because of the violations the truce and agreement between The Netherlands Government and Rep. of Indonesia, the Dutch struck, plunging into a war of white men against brown men.

At midnight the Dutch struck. Troops seized the radio, the cable office, and Republican government buildings in Batavia, seat of the Dutch administration in Java. Next day, Dutch planes struck at the Republic’s weak air force (about 40 old Japanese planes), which they caught on the ground. With artillery preparation,…

Three in One

526

The Netherlands, Belgium and Luxembourg are well on the way to economic unity. Ready to adopt a joint customs schedule for all foreign goods shipped into the Lowlands.

While people talked, more earnestly than ever before, about a possible European federation, the Lowlands countries did something about it. The Netherlands, Belgium and Luxembourg (an economic unit which would likely rank third after U.S. and Britain as the world’s biggest free-enterprise producer and customer) were well on the way…

Beginning of Lightness

328

For the first time in five years Batavia echoed to the burst of festive fireworks rather than lethal gunfire. The occasion was the signing of a long-delayed agreement (TIME, Dec. 23).

Mercurial President Soekarno was too preoccupied to comment. He was busy discussing his favorite hobby—painting—with a visiting artist. But elsewhere in Java last week Indonesians were delirious with joy. After 19 long months of bloody warfare, at least a measure of peace and independence had come to Indonesia…

Tugboat Tycoon

656

Because of the war, not the Dutch, who had a virtual monopoly before the war, nor the British, but a U.S. based company received a tugboat job from the Netherlands government.

Most everyone knows one fact about tugboats: a good tugboat man can hurl a torrid phrase across the water hard enough to make it bounce. But few know another important fact: that the Dutch had a virtual monopoly before the war on deep-sea towing.

Last week, Edmond Joseph Moran, a…

Cleveland, Jan. 9,10,11.

3881

At the Institute of the Cleveland Council on World Affairs  Van Kleffens is representing the Netherlands. His tiny nation’s stake in the solution of world problems is immense.

What does the rest of the world expect of the U.S.? What is the U.S. going to do about it?

On the answers to those two questions will hang issues of war or peace, of economic reconstruction or decline—indeed, the shape of the world for the next two or…

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