Netherlands in TIME magazine

Articles on Holland (Nederland) in 85 years of TIME (1923 – 2008)

The Hero of Haarlem

313

The practical Dutch pointed out that the story of Hans Brinker was not true and technically quite implausible, but last week the Dutch Tourist Association had erected his bronze statue.

He looked up and saw a small hole in the dike through which a tiny stream was flowing. Any child in Holland will shudder at the thought of a leak in the dike! . . . That little hole, if the water were allowed to trickle through, would soon be…

In Memoriam

125

In memory, of the 13 U.S. newsmen that died in a planecrash, the Dutch government established the William the Silent Award (best annual article on The Netherlands by a U.S. writer).

One year ago last week, 13 U.S. newsmen (including TIME’S Jack Werkley), coming home from an assignment in Indonesia, died in the crash of a Dutch plane near Bombay, India (TIME, July 25, 1949). Last week, in their memory, The Netherlands government established the William the Silent Award. The prize,…

Little Moscow

354

In Finsterwolde, communists have been in the majority, in peacetime years since 1933. Last week the Dutch government asked Parliament to dissolve the Finsterwolde town council.

Finsterwolde (pop. 3,250) in northeastern Holland, hard by the German frontier, looks like any other scrubbed Dutch town; but it is not. Every year Finsterwolde sends a wire addressed to the Kremlin offering Joseph Stalin birthday congratulations. And Finsterwolde’s town fathers have officially made known that should Soviet forces cross…

The Right to Tolerance

328

According to Jesuit Father Antonio Messineo in Rome the Netherlands will be a tolerant country when Dutch Catholics become a majority.

“There’s no question of innovation, but only of clarification,” protested black-haired Jesuit Father Antonio Messineo in Rome last week. Those who regarded his article in the Jesuit fortnightly Civiltâ Cattolica as something new in Roman Catholic thought, he said, were wrong. Father Messineo’s conclusion had been that “tolerance is a…

Ire over Irian

340

When the Dutch recognized Indonesia’s independence (in November 1949), the status of Irian, which both countries claimed, would be settled at a conference to be held within a year.

In the Indonesian’s atlas the western part of New Guinea is called Irian. No one is quite sure what the word signifies. One theory is that it means nothing, another that it means “warm land.” It is, indeed, a torrid jungle and mountain wilderness as big as California. Sparsely inhabited…

Jungle Girl

608

Riots broke out after Muslims resented the court decision to give custody of Maria Hertogh to her biological Dutch Catholic parents after she had been raised by a Muslim foster mother.

Maria Bertha Hertogh was five years old when the Japanese soldiers took her mother & father away from Bandung, Java, where papa Adriaanus Hertogh was a sergeant in The Netherlands East Indies army. Bertha was too young to remember just how it happened, but while she was staying at the…

Impasse Over Irian

232

The Hague conference, where Indonesia and The Netherlands were trying to settle the status of West New Guinea (or Irian, as the Indonesians call it) failed after three weeks.

Dutch newsmen at The Hague conference, where Indonesia and The Netherlands were trying to settle the status of West New Guinea (or Irian, as the Indonesians call it), knew that negotiations had reached a delicate impasse. It was no time to confront the sensitive Indonesians with a blunt question, so…

Ike’s Trip

699

Dwight Eisenhower traveled thru W. Europe and found out that P.M. Drees is more interested in social progress than in rearmament.

A Paul Revere in a silver Constellation, NATO Commander General Dwight Eisenhower* last week traveled fast and hard across Western Europe.

In Paris, where official appointments begin at 10 a.m., Ike was at Premier René Pleven’s office door at 8. Half an hour later he was at the Quai d’Orsay…

Misbehavior at Amsterdam

393

The musicians of the Concertgebouw protested when the orchestra manager picked Paul van Kempen as a stand-in conducter, because he conducted a few times for the Wehrmacht.

The musicians of Amsterdam’s distinguished old Concertgebouw protested when the orchestra manager picked Paul van Kempen to take the place of their sick-abed regular conductor.

Van Kempen was born Dutch and had been a Concertgebouw first violinist at 17. He had, years later, become conductor of the Dresden Philharmonic and…

SPEAKING OF DIVISIONS

541

Based on the available figures and on guesses TIME says the Netherlands has “nothing now” available to NATO. There is astiff opposition to military spending at expense of welfare.

This is a full U.S. infantry division (Pennsylvania’s 28th, National Guard). How many such divisions can the Western allies muster against Russia’s 175 divisions? Despite Eisenhower’s reluctance to give a specific answer, some facts & figures are available. The following is a catalogue of the twelve NATO nations’ ground strength,…

Death of a Volunteer

198

Lieut. Colonel Den Ouden, veteran of service in Indonesia, among the first to volunteer when The Netherlands decided to send a force to Korea, died in a ambush of Chinese communists.

Lieut. Colonel M.P.A. den Ouden, 40, paratrooper and veteran of service in Indonesia, was among the first to volunteer when The Netherlands decided to send a force to Korea. At the head of 600-odd Dutch soldiers, he arrived in the battle theater last November.

Colonel den Ouden and his men…

Double Check

159

Professor Cornelius Jan Bakker, a leading Dutch nuclear physicist, arrived at Huemul Island in Argentina, to audit on Ronald Richter, who had been arrested by Juan Perón.

The Argentine government made a cagily indirect answer last week to reports that Juan Perón had arrested Ronald Richter, his “atomic scientist” (TIME, May 28). Newspapers announced that Professor Richter and his laboratory associates would observe a national holiday by working 24 hours straight.

But Richter made no public…

Businessman Boxer

3306

Boxer Sugar Ray Robinson had gone through three fight days since he arrived in Europe, winning from some of the best of Europe’s middleweights among them Dutch Jan de Bruin,

For the professional boxer, fight day is a solemn day, and World Middleweight Champion Sugar Ray Robinson takes it as solemnly as lesser men. There are no high jinks, none of the footloose fun of other days. It is a time for early morning prayer, which Sugar Ray makes in…

It Happened in Chicago

291

In The Netherlands, Golfer Gerard de Wit is in a class by himself, has won the professional championship five times. Last month he had his first look at tournament golf, U.S. style and lost.

In The Netherlands, Golfer Gerard de Wit is in a class by himself, has won the professional championship five times. Last month he had his first look at tournament golf, U.S. style. Back in The Hague last week, still a little dazed by it all, he told his countrymen about…

The Struik Case

428

Lecturing in the U.S. Dutchborn Professor Dirk Struik is according to the FBI an active and dedicated Communist. A nationwide fund-raising campaign began in his defense.

Except for a scattering of top-level mathematicians across the nation, and the students in his classes at M.I.T., few Americans had ever heard of Dirk J. Struik when his name first appeared in the news two years ago. He was a mousy-looking mathematician who had come to the U.S. from…

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